Some Old Characters 

of Deanshanger Remembered.

And a few tales connected with the village.

By

W.H.Foddy

                                     

Some more info and replies to my mail to Mr Foddy 

Sun, 20 May 2001 10:05:15 -0000

 re yours on the so-called Deanshanger House. As a kid I always thought it a
great cheek that during the war a family of Germans should move in and call
it "Deanshanger House". I remember the tiling being put on shortly after
Wreschner moved in. We used to watch it being done from the school, and I
would guess it to have been done in 1941 or 42. Before that it was plain
stone. I believe a Mrs Wrymill lived there for a few years before that, a
very nice lady who got much involved in civil defence during the war,
Women's Institute and all that. Before that of course, it was the home of
Tommy Roberts, one of the second generation foundry owners. He was the
father of Remillion Roberts who lived in the thatched cottage on the corner
nearby. That's about all I can tell you.
Sounds to me as if it's being restored to what it was 60 years ago.

Sat, 14 Jul 2001 14:15:50 -0000

your e-mail re the above house mystified me a little because I can't
remember a house that was known for having no windows at all.
I thought at first she must mean the "Lighthouse", the house shown in one of
your pics on the opposite side of the brook to the old foundry fitting shop,
but looking at it it clearly shows a window up and down. This was a
notorious house as it had only one up and one down (rooms I mean) and the
occupants had to go upstairs by means of a ladder!
How they coped with kids I do not know.
The last people to live there were Walter Alderman, (Peaceful Walter) and
family, and I believe Helen alderman was born there.
The only house which I think could qualify is to be seen in your view
"Looking up High Street". On the right hand side, between the row of
terraced houses and the double roofed house which still stands opposite the
post office is a house, long since gone. This is where "Piper" Henson
lived, and I mention him amongst my characters of Deanshanger. The house
had no windows looking over the road or at the sides, but it did have a tiny
window at the back which let in a glimmer of light.
The interesting thing is - why would anybody want to live in a house
without windows? Could it be because he had no wish to see out? I think it
more likely, as a Deanshanger man, that he didn't want anybody to look in
and see what he was up to!
Regards

Fri, 30 Nov 2001 20:36:24 -0000.

Hello our kid!

its a long time since we talked.  You last mentioned Deanshanger house.  I had a look at it the other day, my god they uncovered something there I must say.  Looks as though they don't don't know what to do next.

With regard to Wilmins - oddly enough I am distantly related to the Wilmins both on my mothers side of the family, her uncle Harold Rogers married Rose Wilmin, and on my fathers side, his cousin Harry Foddy at Hangar Lodge married an Elizabeth Wilmin.  His daughter Lena died a few weeks ago and a lady unknown to me intorduced herself as a Wilmin.  Unforunately I didn't ask her where she lived but I just might be able to contact her through somebody else.  When I was a kid there were a family of Wilmins lived in a house, now gone, just on the Little London side of Shepperds Corner, where the shops are now.  They had a son, Ron, who was a lot older then me.  They disappeared from Deanshanger many years ago.

Would you like me to e-mail Lorraine Keyser?

Many Thanks for thinking of me,

hope you are well,

Regards,    Bill Foddy

These are odd snippets that Bill has sent me

Hi Ken,
I live in MK. Used to live in Puxley Road. My father was Louis Foddy, he
died 1973, I don't suppose you remember him. My mother died 1982. We lived
there since 1936. I was born up the old yard opposite the Post Office. My
dad was born in the red brick house fronting the road opposite the post
office. My gramp was born in the house by the school, on the green. His
dad was born at the Beehive and his mum had the first licence there about
1845. So you can see I'm slightly bound up by Deanshanger!

20th May 2001

re yours on the so-called Deanshanger House.  As a kid I always thought it a
great cheek that during the war a family of Germans should move in and call
it "Deanshanger House".  I remember the tiling being put on shortly after
Wreschner moved in.  We used to watch it being done from the school, and I
would guess it to have been done in 1941 or 42.  Before that it was plain
stone.  I believe a Mrs Wrymill lived there for a few years before that, a
very nice lady who got much involved in civil defence during the war,
Women's Institute and all that.  Before that of course, it was the home of
Tommy Roberts, one of the second generation foundry owners.  He was the
father of Remillion Roberts who lived in the thatched cottage on the corner
nearby.  That's about all I can tell you.
Sounds to me as if it's being restored to what it was 60 years ago.

14th July 2001 Re house without windows

your e-mail re the above house mystified me a little because I can't
remember a house that was known for having no windows at all.
I thought at first she must mean the "Lighthouse", the house shown in one of
your pics on the opposite side of the brook to the old foundry fitting shop,
but looking at it it clearly shows a window up and down.  This was a
notorious house as it had only one up and one down (rooms I mean) and the
occupants had to go upstairs by means of a ladder!
   How they coped with kids I do not know.
   The last people to live there were Walter Alderman, (Peaceful Walter) and
family, and I believe Helen alderman was born there.
   The only house which I think could qualify is to be seen in your view
"Looking up High Street".  On the right hand side, between the row of
terraced houses and the double roofed house which still stands opposite the
post office is a house, long since gone.  This is where "Piper" Henson
lived, and I mention him amongst my characters of Deanshanger.  The house
had no windows looking over the road or at the sides, but it did have a tiny
window at the back which let in a glimmer of light.
   The interesting thing is - why would anybody want to live in a house
without windows?  Could it be because he had no wish to see out?  I think it
more likely, as a Deanshanger man, that he didn't want anybody to look in
and see what he was up to!

1st Aug 2002

trust you are well.  Thanks for yours.  I have recieved one from Howard Benbrook.  I really can't tell him any more than in my little tale.  He seems keen to know when he died.  My memory is none too good on this, I said I thought around 1965.  Do you know anybody who might know when he died or anything else about him, such as relatives etc?

Another complete loner in my memory is Billy Smallbones.  He was a coal merchant who, as far as I know had no family at all.  His coal yard was opposite Tom Canvins, with a small wharf on the canal.  I think the site has stood empty ever since he died and nobody knows who it might belong to.  (Interesting little project to get your teeth into)